What makes a villain essay

Need to prepare for a villainous role? Are you bored of acting like a hero? You might see in movies or comics the good guy always wins against the bad, but the villain looks more captivating and cool. It's not always easy to break out of the "good" shell, but with a wicked look and a disastrous attitude, you can become a villain.

In an attempt to add realism to their stories, many writers will try to create "sympathetic" villains, the antithesis to an antihero called an anti-villain . These villains come in just as many shapes and sizes as anti-heroes do. Some may wish to make the world a better place but go to antagonistic lengths to do so (such as Doctor Octopus in Spider-Man 2 , who commits various crimes in an attempt to complete his goal of creating a cheap, renewable source of energy, and Dr. Horrible in Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog , who wants to rule the world so that he can solve all of its problems), or may employ a code of honor in fighting his enemies, even if it is to achieve antagonistic goals (examples include Murdock, a secondary villain in the game Fire Emblem: Fūin no Tsurugi , who is honorable, but fights the player's army due to loyalty to his country). Other sympathetic villains may be pushed to antagonistic lifestyles by society's mistreatment of him due to prejudice against something he is a part of (such as racism , as is the case in American History X ), but goes to absurd lengths to achieve the equality he desires. Others may include those manipulated by malevolent and opprobrious forces (such as Jack Torrance being manipulated by the Overlook Hotel in The Shining ).

Notably, at the start of the film and musical play, Gaston did not seem truly evil. Rather, he was simply conceited, male-chauvinistic, boorish, and rude than a true villain, but as time goes on his pride and obsession with Belle becomes so intense that it turns him into a twisted, sadistic and murderous monster. His speech to get the mob to kill the Beast in order to protect the village is nothing more than a ploy to get them to help him infiltrate the castle. Gaston does not care about the village very much, even if he genuinely does believe that the Beast is a threat. All he wants is to kill his rival so he can have Belle as his property. By the time of his death, Gaston feels that if he can't have Belle, nobody can. In an earlier version of the story, he was even going to commit suicide after killing the Beast as he knew that no matter what he did, Belle would never love him.

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This version of How to Create a Perfect Villain was reviewed by Stephanie Wong Ken on June 12, 2016.

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what makes a villain essay

What makes a villain essay

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what makes a villain essay

What makes a villain essay

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what makes a villain essay

What makes a villain essay

Notably, at the start of the film and musical play, Gaston did not seem truly evil. Rather, he was simply conceited, male-chauvinistic, boorish, and rude than a true villain, but as time goes on his pride and obsession with Belle becomes so intense that it turns him into a twisted, sadistic and murderous monster. His speech to get the mob to kill the Beast in order to protect the village is nothing more than a ploy to get them to help him infiltrate the castle. Gaston does not care about the village very much, even if he genuinely does believe that the Beast is a threat. All he wants is to kill his rival so he can have Belle as his property. By the time of his death, Gaston feels that if he can't have Belle, nobody can. In an earlier version of the story, he was even going to commit suicide after killing the Beast as he knew that no matter what he did, Belle would never love him.

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what makes a villain essay
What makes a villain essay

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What makes a villain essay

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what makes a villain essay

What makes a villain essay

In an attempt to add realism to their stories, many writers will try to create "sympathetic" villains, the antithesis to an antihero called an anti-villain . These villains come in just as many shapes and sizes as anti-heroes do. Some may wish to make the world a better place but go to antagonistic lengths to do so (such as Doctor Octopus in Spider-Man 2 , who commits various crimes in an attempt to complete his goal of creating a cheap, renewable source of energy, and Dr. Horrible in Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog , who wants to rule the world so that he can solve all of its problems), or may employ a code of honor in fighting his enemies, even if it is to achieve antagonistic goals (examples include Murdock, a secondary villain in the game Fire Emblem: Fūin no Tsurugi , who is honorable, but fights the player's army due to loyalty to his country). Other sympathetic villains may be pushed to antagonistic lifestyles by society's mistreatment of him due to prejudice against something he is a part of (such as racism , as is the case in American History X ), but goes to absurd lengths to achieve the equality he desires. Others may include those manipulated by malevolent and opprobrious forces (such as Jack Torrance being manipulated by the Overlook Hotel in The Shining ).

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what makes a villain essay

What makes a villain essay

Notably, at the start of the film and musical play, Gaston did not seem truly evil. Rather, he was simply conceited, male-chauvinistic, boorish, and rude than a true villain, but as time goes on his pride and obsession with Belle becomes so intense that it turns him into a twisted, sadistic and murderous monster. His speech to get the mob to kill the Beast in order to protect the village is nothing more than a ploy to get them to help him infiltrate the castle. Gaston does not care about the village very much, even if he genuinely does believe that the Beast is a threat. All he wants is to kill his rival so he can have Belle as his property. By the time of his death, Gaston feels that if he can't have Belle, nobody can. In an earlier version of the story, he was even going to commit suicide after killing the Beast as he knew that no matter what he did, Belle would never love him.

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what makes a villain essay

What makes a villain essay

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What makes a villain essay

This version of How to Create a Perfect Villain was reviewed by Stephanie Wong Ken on June 12, 2016.

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What makes a villain essay

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